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Climbing a Ladder
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1 Radon Fan
Typical Interior Installation
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Suburban House

Radon Mitigation

What is a radon mitigation system?
 

A radon mitigation system is any system or steps designed to reduce radon concentrations in the indoor air of a building.

The EPA recommends that you take action to reduce your home's indoor radon levels if your radon test result is 4 pCi/L or higher.


What are the benefits of radon mitigation?
 

The primary benefit is reducing the risk of developing lung cancer.  Standard radon reduction systems are usually effective within 24 hours and maintain low levels as long as the fan is operating.  Another potential benefit of these systems is reduced infiltration of moist soil air with the radon, which may reduce the humidity level in the basement of the home.  Homeowners should consider correcting a radon problem before making final preparations to sell a home.  This often provides more time to address the problem and find the most cost-effective solution.  In addition, the current occupants--not just the buyer's occupants--will reap the benefit of reduced risk.
 

What can be done to reduce radon in a home?
 

Your house type will affect the kind of radon reduction system that will work best. Houses are generally categorized according to their foundation design. For example: basement, slab-on-grade (concrete poured at ground level), or crawlspace (a shallow unfinished space under the first floor). Some houses have more than one foundation design feature. For instance, it is common to have a basement under part of the house and to have a slab-on-grade or crawlspace under the rest of the house. In these situations a combination of radon reduction techniques may be needed to reduce radon levels to below 4 pCi/L.
 

There are several methods that American Radon Systems can use to lower radon levels in your home. Some techniques prevent radon from entering your home while others reduce radon levels after it has entered. the EPA generally recommends methods that prevent the entry of radon.  In many cases, simple systems using underground pipes and an exhaust fan may be used to reduce radon. Such systems are called "sub-slab depressurization," and do not require major changes to your home. These systems remove radon gas from below the concrete floor and the foundation before it can enter the home. Similar systems can also be installed in houses with crawl spaces. The right system depends on the design of your home and other factors.


Sealing cracks and other openings in the floors and walls is a basic part of most approaches to radon reduction. Sealing does two things, it limits the flow of radon into your home and it reduces the loss of conditioned air, thereby making other radon reduction techniques more effective and cost-efficient. The EPA does not recommend the use of sealing alone to reduce radon because, by itself, sealing has not been shown to lower radon levels significantly or consistently. It is difficult to identify and permanently seal the places where radon is entering. Normal settling of your house opens new entry routes and reopens old ones

Information provided by Kansas State University National Radon Program Services

Call us today on 1-815-370-9682

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